Artistic talent belongs to everyone.

Everywhere I go
I hear the same story.

 

It goes like this. Someone asks me where I work or what I do. I say I am an artist and that I teach art. Right then and there, unsolicited, a very closely held story of their personal artistic wreckage emerges. I see it coming. I listen.

They tell me their verdict to never draw again is final.

The type of person who tells this story is boundless. A professional woman in the boarding line for an airplane, a nurse practictioner extracting my stitches, a beginning student who confesses she is ready to bolt from the classroom the first time she is asked to create something.

The truth is, they were originally going somewhere. They were on a path, then were interrupted.

Draw daily.
Improve your life.

 

Modern research is now showing what artists and art educators have known for decades — drawing is good for you, both mentally and physically.

For example, subjects in a 2015 study in Science Direct reported that art expression helped them focus on the present moment, improve emotion and impulse regulation, mediate unwanted behaviors, and gain higher levels of insight and comprehension.

Moreover, these benefits should be available to everyone, including you. The idea that have to be a "world-class art genius" to enjoy making colors and marks appear on paper is patently false. Just as mindfulness is no longer reserved for Tibetan monks, making art should not be reserved for the Michaelangelos of the world.

Get in touch.

Margaret Welty is available for workshops, speaking engagements, or simply to talk about art and teaching. To book Margaret at your school or business, or to inquire about her college courses, please contact her using the form below.